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Frequently Asked Questions - Answered by Chris Rice

 

Bermuda grass, Native Grass, Fescue, Bahia

Ryegrass, Wheat, Cereal Rye

Weed Control Pastures, Brush Control

Corn, Soybeans, Peanuts

Alfalfa, Clovers, Summer Legumes

Grazing Management

 

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BERMUDA GRASS:

 

1)    What is the yield potential of Bermuda grass in S.E. Oklahoma?

Under high fertility, some of the newer varieties of Bermuda have the potential to produce above 6 tons of forage when high rates of nitrogen are applied on deep, moderately drained soils. With no fertility, on average, we expect 1 ton of production/year on Bermuda grass pastures. With the rainfall we receive in S.E. Oklahoma, 3 to 4 tons/ac is easy to accomplish under the proper soil fertility practices.

2)    When is the best time to sprig a Bermuda grass pasture?

Mid February through Mid April is the best time. Later than this, we run into problems with excessive annual grass competition and moisture loss during the time the Bermuda grass is trying to spread.

3)    When is the best time to Seed Bermuda grass in S.E. Oklahoma?

April and May are the months that will provide the best chance of establishing a stand.

4)    What is the suggested seeding rate for Bermuda grass?

Plant 5 to 10 lbs of pls per acre on a fine firm seed bed.

5)    How much Bermuda grass can I grow with 150 lb of Ammonium nitrate applied per acre?

150 lbs of Amm. Nitrate is about 50 units of N. A good rule of thumb is that for every addition 50 units of N added, we would  expect a ton of production. We normally expect Bermuda grass to produce 1 ton without fertilizer so adding 50 units of N should increase our production to 2 tons per acre. A better strategy would be to add 100 units of N to increase production to 3 tons per acre since the Bermuda is more efficient at these higher levels of nitrogen fertility. If the pasture has not been fertilized in previous years expect it to take two years before you see an increase in forage production. The first year application will be used by the plants to spread with little or no increase in forage production.

6)    How important is phosphorus in Bermuda grass production?

Studies have shown that very low phosphorous soils can reduce forage production by as much as 50%.

7)    When is the best time to fertilize Bermuda grass?

That depends! In pastures that have no cool season grasses in them like ryegrass, fertilizing from Mid April to the first of May would be recommended. If the pasture has ryegrass, fertilizing for the Bermuda growth should take place May 1 to June 1. If fertilized earlier than this the ryegrass will use up that fertilizer before the Bermuda has a chance to begin growing rapidly. If fall forage is needed, fertilizing Bermuda in late august can provide high quality grazing well into December.

8)    What is the protein content of Bermuda grass in the winter?

Unfertilized old growth Bermuda, will have protein contents in the 3 to 5 % range. Fall fertilized Bermuda has been known to hold protein contents of 10 to 12% all the way up into January.

9)    I have a Bermuda grass pasture that have just a few scattered weak plants in it. Should I re-sprig it?

Probably not, sprigging a Bermuda grass pasture can cost upwards of $100 per acre, and the loss of a years worth of production. If the pasture has Bermuda grass plants scattered throughout the field, it would be more cost effective to properly fertilize it. It should recover to a full stand within two years and you would be able to continue to graze it during the recovery period.

10)    How do I plant those tiny little Bermuda grass seeds?

The best way would be to plant it with a specialized seeder that can handle small seed. One brand is a Brillion seeder that drops the seed and a set of packer wheels push it into contact with the soil. If a seeder is un-available, scattering the seed with a three point whirly bird seeder can be effective. Start with the gate on the seeder closed as tightly as it will go and still allow seed to come out. Test it on a few acres and adjust it open if enough seed is not being applied.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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NATIVE GRASS:

1)    What is the yield potential of Native grass in my pasture?

It would be best if you measured each of you pastures yourself. Your county extension educator can provide you with instructions on how it is done. You can also go to your local N.R.C.S. office and find your pasture in the county soil survey. After determining what soil type the pasture is, you can then find the table that list average yields for native grass for that soil type. 

2)    How can I protect my Native grass stand from overgrazing?

The best way is to find out how much yearly production is expected and then only stock enough animals so that they are only consuming of that production. The old rule of take half leave half applies here. Then, you have to consider that the animals will only get to eat of that since the bugs and environment will get of the production. You should only stock enough animals so that your cattle are only consuming a of the potential production.

3)    Should I plow up my Native grass stand and plant an improved pasture grass like Bermuda or fescue?

Probably not, since native grass in good condition needs little or no management inputs, there is no cheaper way to put forage in an animal if you have plenty of acres. On the other hand, if you have few acres, and must raise a large number of animals on a small acreage, then an introduced grass might fit you better.

4)    How do I go about planting native grass?

First, you would want to make sure the fertility of the soil was properly taken care of. Then you would need to prepare a fine firm seed bed. The next step would be to obtain seed with a good mix of native grass adapted to your local area. The seed should be planted in deep with a commercial drill that has a fluffy seed agitator at 10 to 16 lbs of pls per acre.

5)    I have an overgrazed native grass pasture, how can I help it recover?

The best way would be to defer grazing for 1 or two years. Leave cattle out of the pasture till after frost and get them off prior to spring green up. Native grass is a very resilient plant community and if the land has not been plowed in its prior history, with a little rest it will recover quite rapidly. If you cannot defer the grazing completely, consider reducing stocking rate by for 4 or 5 years.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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FESCUE:

1)    Why would I want to grow Fescue on my ranch?

Fescue is a high quality cool season perennial grass that can reduce the amount of feed and forage you pour into your cow herd during the winter months. Reducing feeding costs is one of the best ways of increasing a cow herds profitability.

2)    What is the toxin in fescue that everyone talks about?

Fescue has a fungus that grows inside the plant that helps it reduce insect feeding and provides the plant with some drought tolerance. These funguses are known as endophyte funguses and have alkaloids in them that can be toxic to cattle if consumed in high quantities. A good manager can work around this problem with some grazing management and still profit from the availability of high quality green forage during the winter months.

3)    What is endophyte free fescue?

Endophyte free fescues are varieties that have been identified that dont have the fungus in the fescue plant. They offer high quality winter forage without the toxic effects of the infected fescue. The problem is that they cannot withstand hard grazing in the spring and stands tend to decline rapidly.

4)    What is endophyte friendly fescue?

Friendly fescues are fescues that have a modified endophyte fungus in the plant that lends insect and drought resistance to the plant but are less toxic to the livestock. Currently the seed is expensive, but the benefits to grazing animals can be well worth the cost.

5)    When is the best time to fertilize fescue?

Late August is the best time to fertilize toxic fescue so that it can be stockpiled for grazing in Jan. and Feb. We do not however want to fertilize it for spring growth in February because of the problems with the build up of toxic portions of the plant in the spring. Fungus free and friendly endophyte fescue can be fertilized in the fall and mid winter if maximum production is expected.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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BAHIAGRASS:

1)    What is Bahiagrass and should I plant it?

Bahiagrass is a warm season perennial grass that does well in low fertility environments. It will respond to nitrogen fertility and can withstand heavy grazing pressure. It is however, not very cold tolerant and does best south of a line from Poteau, Ok. to Durant, Ok., where it has less chance of freezing out in severe winters. If you want a grass that will hold the ground together with minimum inputs, you may want to look at Bahia.

2)    What kind of yields can I expect from Bahia?

Bahia can produce 2 to 3 tons of production per acre when fertilized with 100 units of N per acre. (200 lb/ac urea)

3)    What is the quality of Bahia throughout the year?

Bahia will have the same quality as Bermuda up to the middle of July. After this time the quality and digestibility fall off rapidly.

4)    Can I grow Bahiagrass in my county?

Bahia will grow in all the counties in southeast Oklahoma until we have an extremely cold winter. It will withstand the winters best in Atoka, Bryan, Choctaw, Pushmataha, and McCurtain counties.

5)    How do I kill Bahia out of my Bermuda grass pasture?

Disk it in September or October and let it winter kill. You  will not get 100% control and you will essentially be re-sprigging the Bermuda grass. Also expect new plants to come up from seed. There are some chemicals that are active against Bahia. Check with your extension educator for chemical options.

 For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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RYEGRASS:

1)    Why would I want to grow ryegrass?

Ryegrass is a high quality cool season annual grass that can reduce the amount of feed and forage you pour into your cow herd during the winter months. Reducing feeding costs is one of the best ways of increasing a cow herds profitability.

2)    What kind of yields could I expect?

Ryegrass will only produce about 900 lbs of forage in the fall, thus, limiting its winter grazing potential. It can however, with proper fertility, produce between 2 and 3 tons of forage from March through May helping to reduce the winter feeding period.

3)    What kind of quality does ryegrass have throughout the year?

Ryegrass, when in a vegetative state, will on average have a protein content of 12 16% and a TDN of 63 68, after the plants start to go to seed, protein = 8 -12% and TDN = 59 63. Compared this to mid bloom alfalfa, protein = 14 18, with a TDN of 58 -61.

1)    How does ryegrass respond to nitrogen fertility?

We normally expect a ton of ryegrass production for every 60 units of N we apply. (120 lb/ac urea)

2)    How much ryegrass seed should I plant and when?

Ryegrass should be seeded at 20 to 25 lb/ac in October. The seeds are very small and ryegrass is an aggressive plant so broadcast application of the seeds works well.

3)    What effect does ryegrass production have on my Bermuda grass production when they are grown in the same pasture?

Ryegrass is a very competitive plant and will use up all of the nitrogen and a lot of the water in a pasture prior to the Bermuda grass greening up. If allowed to grow some height, it will also shade the Bermuda grass and inhibit its growth. If a Bermuda grass crop is expected that summer, a producer should have the ryegrass grazed or hayed off close by May 1. A nitrogen fertilizer should be applied at 50 units of N (May 1 to May 15) for ever ton of Bermuda grass yield expected. 

4)    What is the best variety of ryegrass to plant?

Any of the commercially available ryegrass varieties will do well under normal fertility conditions.

5)    How do I over-seed ryegrass on my Bermuda grass pasture?

Ryegrass can be mixed with fertilizer and applied to the pasture through the fertilizer spreader or it can be spread with a three point whirly bird type seeder. It can also be planted by a drill with a small seed box but care should be taken to not plant it deeper than inch. With broadcast seeding, pulling a chain harrow over the pasture after seeding will increase germination and survival of the plants.

6)    Do I need to re-seed my pastures to ryegrass every year?

It is almost impossible to keep ryegrass from reseeding itself. That being said, we do recommend that the pasture be reseeded with 5 to 10 lbs of seed per acre mixed in with fall fertilizer application to insure a healthy stand.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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WHEAT:

1)    What kind of forage yields can I expect from planting wheat?

With adequate fertility, 1500 to 2000 lbs of production in the fall and 4000 lbs in the spring.

2)    How much nitrogen fertilizer should I be putting on my wheat?

How much forage do you need? Apply 60 units of N at planting, then top dress 60 to 120 units of N in February. ( 60 units N = 120 lb/ acre of urea)

3)    What is the planting rate for wheat if I am using it for grazing?

Plant wheat at 90 to 120 lbs/acre. The higher planting rate will usually result in higher forage production.

4)    If I drill wheat into Bermuda sod, when can I expect to graze it and what will it yield?

The wheat can be grazed as soon as it begins to grow two or three tillers and the secondary roots have formed. Yield can range from 500 lb/ac to 2000 lb/ac in the fall, depending on the fall weather, and 2000 to 4000 lb/a in the spring.

5)    Can I broadcast my wheat with my fertilizer and get a stand?

Your taking a big chance if you do. On tilled ground, it can work if seeding rates are increased to 160 to 180 lbs/ac and lightly disked in. On sod, broadcasting wheat is a big gamble since the seed to soil contact is not very good and large seeds have a hard time putting down roots and surviving.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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CEREAL RYE:

1)    What kind of forage yields can I expect from planting Rye?

1 to 2 tons of production by February, and another ton by April 1 if fertility is adequate.

2)    How much nitrogen fertilizer should I be putting on my Rye?

How much forage do you need? Apply 60 to 100 units of N at planting, then top dress 60 units of N in February. ( 60 units N = 120 lb/ acre of urea)

3)    Why plant rye instead of wheat?

Rye grows better at cooler temperatures than wheat does and will produce more forage in the fall for winter grazing when we need it the most.

4)    Should I mix rye with wheat for grazing and how much?

Mixing rye with wheat is a good way of extending cool season annual production from fall Sept. to May. A mixture of 40 lbs/ac of rye and 60 lbs/ac of wheat is a good seeding rate for the mixture.

5)    Should I mix rye and annual ryegrass for grazing?

Mixing ryegrass with rye is a good way of extending cool season annual production from fall Sept. to May.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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WEED CONTROL IN PASTURES:

1)    What herbicide should I use on my pastures?

Use the cheapest chemical you can and still get the job done. When weeds are small, 1.5 pints of 2,4-D (4 lb/gallon material) will get the job done. If weeds get taller than 6 inches switch to a product that mixes 2,4-D and either picloram or dicamba.

2)    What kind of yield increase should I expect from spaying for weeds in my pasture?

You will normally only get a pound per pound grass response. For every pound of weeds you kill you will see a pound increase in grass production. If you want to increase the pasture yield, you will need to apply fertilizer at the same time as the weed control is preformed.

3)    How do you kill Sericea Lespedeza?

Apply 1 to 2 pints of remedy in mid May when plants are actively growing. Yearly follow up application will need to be made in order to kill newly germinating seed.

4)    What is the best way to control Horsenettle?

Apply 2 pints/ac of Grazon P+D when plants are in full flower. (June)

5)    When should I spray my pastures for weeds?

Before you can see the weeds from your pickup window.  Most weeds are easiest to kill when they are from 2 to 6 inches tall. In S.E. Oklahoma, this is usually the last 2 weeks in April  and the first week of May.

6)    How do you kill goatweed?

Treat it in late April with 1.5 pints of 2,4-d or 1 pint of Grazon P+D.

7)    How do I get rid of these sand burs?

Sell that place and buy a better one. We do not have a good answer for this question. Best bet is to fertilize this pasture well, cut it for hay or graze it hard before burs set seed heads. Then live with it the rest of the year. With fertility, over time the grass will sometimes out compete the burs and you will have fewer burs. But you will probably never be rid of them.

8)    How do you control blackberries?

Do not mow or burn for two years. Treat with1 pint of remedy/ac for two years in a row.

9)    How do I get rid of these greenbriers in my pasture?

Mow or burn them any time the vines get taller than 2 feet. Let the cattle and deer graze them. Over time they will slowly die out. For fence lines or spot treatment mix 1 quart of remedy + 1 gallon of Grazon P+D + 1 quart of surfactant in 100 gallons of water and spray until they drip, June or Sept. This will give partial control.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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BRUSH CONTROL:

1)    Does it pay to do brush control?

On thick brush, estimates run from $50 to$100 per acre. After control, stocking rates would be at best 8 acres per cow. How long would it take for a cow to pay back $400 to $800 dollars. If you have open Bermuda grass areas that you are not fertilizing to their full potential, it would be cheaper to grow more grass on those Bermuda acres with higher inputs of fertility. If it makes the land worth more money to have the brush removed, then the answer might be yes.

2)    What is the best way of controlling scattered brush that is invading my pasture?

Identify the species that are most common and then pick a chemical and application method that will work best on that species. Your local County Extension Educator can help you with this. Once you have controlled the most prevalent species, you can then switch to a chemical that will do well on the remaining brush species.

3)    How do I get a handle on this cedar problem?

Burn or mow that pasture any time you see trees in the 1 to 2 foot category. Cedars can grow a foot a year and in ten years a 2 foot tall tree will be twelve feet tall.

4)    I am planning on dozing 40 acres this year, how do I control the sprouts in the years to come?

You would be better off to treat the trees with a chemical and kill them prior to dozing them. It is very difficult to kill crown and root sprouts since they have a larger root to shoot ratio. Kill the trees first, let them rot for a year or two, and they will be easier and cheaper to doze.

5)    How do I control persimmons?

Persimmons are very difficult to control. Applying 3 cc of straight tordon per inch of stem diameter at breast height has given me the best control. Do not expect 100% control.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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CORN:

1)    When do I plant corn in Southeast Oklahoma?

Corn should be planted when the soil temperature reaches 55 degrees at two inches deep and stays at that temperature for three days.

2)    What are the seeding rates?

Seeding rate is 28,000 to 34,000 seeds per acre in irrigated corn depending on the amount of water available for irrigation and the intended use of the crop. Non-irrigated seeding rates range from 18,000 to 26,000 seeds per acre.

3)    What would be a good herbicide program to use to keep weeds from becoming a problem?

There are many approved herbicides for weed control in corn. For broadleaf weed control, atrazine is still one of the best and cheapest options. For grass control, pre-emergence chemicals such as Dual or Lasso work well. For post emergence grasses, Accent and Basis Gold work well.

4)    What is aflotoxin?

Aflotoxin is associated with fungus that infects corn during stress periods when hot temperatures and high humidity is experienced during kernel development. Aflotoxins can have toxic effects on livestock and humans. Check with your local county extension educator for more in depth information.

5)    What kind of yields can I expect?

Yields will vary with climate and soil type. Yields can vary from 80 to 140 bushels per acre with an average of about 110 bushel under normal management practices and good growing conditions.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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SOYBEANS:

1)    When should I plant soybeans in Southeast Oklahoma?

Early season beans in maturity groups III an IV should be planted in April. Full season beans in maturity groups V and VI should be planted from May 1 to June 30.

2)    I want to use roundup ready beans, what should I know?

Glyphosate application should be made when weeds are 4 to 8 inches tall on soybeans that are at cracking to flowering stages. Read and follow label recommendations prior to making application of any pesticide.

3)    What maturity group of soybeans should I use?

For early planted beans in April plant group IIIs and IVs.

For full season beans plant in May or June with groups V and VIs.

4)    Should I use a row crop planter or a drill to plant my beans?

It is easier to obtain proper planting depth, seed populations and emergence with a row crop planter. Planters also provide row spacing that will allow for cultivation of the rows to reduce the need for chemical weed control. Drill beans however, with the proper attention to planting depth and population can be an effective method of growing beans and can reduce the need to invest in another planting system.

5)    What about this new Soybean rust, how will it affect me?

Soybean rust has made it to the United States and it is only a matter of time before we see infested fields in Southern Oklahoma. In areas where the pathogen occurs commonly, yield losses up to 80% have been reported. Producers who wish to continue to produce soybeans should begin looking at possible fungicide programs that will reduce the effects of the rust on soybean production.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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ALFALFA:

1)    Will alfalfa grow well in Southeast Oklahoma?

Yes, alfalfa will grow well in S.E. Oklahoma. We do however, have more problems with plant diseases that can reduce the life expectancy of the stands due to our warm temperatures and high rainfall averages. Producers wishing to grow alfalfa should choose plant varieties that have resistance to soil borne diseases as well as insect pests.

2)    When should I plant alfalfa?

Alfalfa can be planted in both the fall and spring, but fall plantings have been much more successful in stand establishment and first year production yields. For S.E. Oklahoma, planting should take place from late Aug. through September.

3)    What kind of Fertility is required?

Properly inoculated alfalfa needs little or no nitrogen fertility, it is however a big user of both phosphorus and potassium. A soil test should be preformed on the field prior to planting and the pH, phosphorus and potassium requirements of the crop should be applied prior to planting.  

4)    What kind of seed bed do I need and how is the best way to plant alfalfa?

A firm fine seed bed is required if alfalfa is expected to germinate and take root. The seed bed should be firm enough so that when you walk across it, your boot heal print should not be readily apparent. The best way to plant it would be with a specialized seeder that can handle small seed. One brand of planter is a Brillion seeder that drops the seed and a set of packer wheels push it into contact with the soil. A drill can be utilized but care should be taken not to plant the seed to deep. Properly calibrate the drill and test it on a few acres to be sure the rate and planting depth are properly set.

5)    What kind of pest pressure can I expect?

Everything likes to eat Alfalfa, from deer to armyworms. Some of the biggest pest problems associated with Alfalfa are insects such as weevils and aphids. These will have to be scouted for in spring and early summer and treated with a pesticide if your stand is expected to survive. Plant pathogens such as soil borne diseases will also be a problem and resistant alfalfa varieties should be planted if a stand is expected to survive for very many years.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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CLOVERS:

1)    What are some of the things I need to consider before committing to planting clovers in my pasture?

PH, phosphorus and potassium should be at the proper levels or you are wasting your time planting clovers.

Seed should be properly inoculated with rhizobium bacteria or the plants wont produce well.

When planted in the fall, other plant competition needs to be reduced so those little clover plants have a chance to become established.

Use a drill to plant the clovers so the seeds have proper seed to soil contact.

2)    What species of clover work best in Southeast Oklahoma?

There are several species that work well here. Some of the more common and proven species are as follows:

Annuals Arrowleaf clover & crimson clover

Short lived perennials red clover, rose clover and white clover.

3)    I have tried planting clover in the past and did not get a stand. How can I insure success?

Visit your local County Extension educator for the proper way to plant clovers. Without proper fertility, inoculation, seed bed preparation, planting & grazing management, most legume plantings are doomed to failure.

4)    Should I plant the entire ranch to clover or just a portion?

It is probably best to devote a portion of your ranch to clover production so that it can be grazed and managed separately from other portions of the ranch. This will allow management that will help promote the clovers in one pasture while allowing you to fertilize another pasture with nitrogen for grazing at a different time period of the year. See your Extension Educator for more grazing management information.

5)    When will clovers provide the most forage for my cattle?

Cool season clovers will provide a little grazing prior to December but most of their production will be from March through May. Depending on the species planted and the years climate, some may provide limited production throughout the summer.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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SUMMER LEGUMES:

1)    What are some of the legumes that will grow during the summer and would benefit my grazing system?

Annual lespedeza ( Korean and Striate) can provide highly nutritious grazing throughout the summer months.

2)     What is the seeding rate for annual lespedeza when over-seeding Bermuda grass pastures and when should they be planted?

Lespedeza should be planted at 25 to 30 lbs/acre of pure live seed in February or March. Be sure that it has been properly inoculated prior to planting.

3)    What type of yields can I expect from annual lespedeza?

With proper fertility and climactic conditions, lespedeza can produce up to 1 to 2 tons per acre. Heavy grass competition can reduce these yields.

4)    What is the difference between annual lespedeza and Sericea lespedeza?

Annual lespedeza is an annual plant that is highly palatable to cattle (It tastes good to them.). Sericea Lesp. is a perennial plant that has high tannin contents that cattle do not like to eat ( It tastes bad to them.).

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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GRAZING MANAGEMENT:

1)    Should I be rotational grazing?

If you have the time to move cattle when they need to be moved, rotational grazing can be a benefit to your grazing operation. You do not have to have 15 pastures to practice rotational grazing. 3 to 4 pastures will give you the opportunity to manage your forage resources to better to fit the needs of your cow herd. If over time you determine a need for more intensive management, you can then divide your paddocks into small acreages and more intensively rotate.

2)    I have native grass and Bermuda grass in separate pastures, how can I best utilize the two?

There are many management scenarios that would work but one of the simplest would be to graze the native from April until June 30, then let it rest until after frost. This will lead to a healthy native grass stand. The Bermuda portion would be fertilized May 1 and August 30. It would then be grazed from July through November. Cattle would then wintered on the dormant native grass with the addition of a grain based supplement. Any left over Bermuda grass would be grazed as needed.

3)    How do I know when to move my cattle in my 6 paddock rotational grazing system?

We normally suggest that introduced forages not be grazed any shorter than 4 to 5 inches. Native grass no shorter than 6 to 8 inches. This gives the plants enough leaf area to recover from the grazing quickly. The cattle over time will also let you know when its time because they will be standing at the gate ready to move. It will take some time to learn your particular system, so be patient.

4)    How do I figure a sustainable stocking rate on my ranch?

The best way is to do a forage and livestock inventory, your local county Extension Educator will have a fact sheet that will make this easy.

5)    How do I reduce weed infestations with grazing management?

The best way to keep weeds from invading a pasture system is to keep the grass healthy and strong. Weeds normally pop up in open spaces where grass plants are not present. By leaving enough grass cover so that the plants can feed themselves and remain strong, we can go a long way in reducing weed invasions into a pasture. This may mean that we will need to reduce stocking rates or move to a rotational stocking system. With introduced grasses, applying fertility can help to strengthen the grasses. It can also make the weeds taste better to the cattle so that they will consume them. By using rotational grazing, we can sometimes force the animals to eat weeds, thereby, reducing the weeds ability to compete with the grass. The bottom line is if we have a healthy, productive, properly stocked forage system, we will have fewer weeds.

For More in-depth information, Contact your Local County Extension Educator.

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